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Severe obesity and comorbid condition impact on the weight-related quality of life of the adolescent patient.

TitleSevere obesity and comorbid condition impact on the weight-related quality of life of the adolescent patient.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsZeller MH, Inge TH, Modi AC, Jenkins TM, Michalsky MP, Helmrath M, Courcoulas A, Harmon CM, Rofey D, Baughcum A, Austin H, Price K, Xanthakos SA, Brandt ML, Horlick M, Buncher R
Corporate AuthorsTeen Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery(Teen-LABS) Consortium
JournalJ Pediatr
Volume166
Issue3
Pagination651-9.e4
Date Published2015 Mar
ISSN1097-6833
KeywordsAdolescent, Bariatric Surgery, Body Weight, Comorbidity, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Male, Obesity, Morbid, Prevalence, Prognosis, Prospective Studies, Quality of Life, United States, Young Adult
Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To assess links between comorbid health status, severe excess weight, and weight-related quality of life (WRQOL) in adolescents with severe obesity and undergoing weight-loss surgery (WLS) to inform clinical care.

STUDY DESIGN: Baseline (preoperative) data from Teen Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery, a prospective multicenter observational study of 242 adolescents with severe obesity (MedianBMI = 50.5 kg/m(2); Meanage = 17.1; 75.6% female; 71.9% white) undergoing WLS, were used to examine the impact of demographics, body mass index (BMI), presence/absence of 16 comorbid conditions, and a cumulative comorbidity load (CLoad) index on WRQOL scores (Impact of Weight on Quality of Life-Kids).

RESULTS: WRQOL was significantly lower than reference samples of healthy weight, overweight, and obese samples. Of 16 comorbid conditions, the most prevalent were dyslipidemia (74.4%), chronic pain (58.3%), and obstructive sleep apnea (56.6%). Male subjects had a greater CLoad (P = .01) and BMI (P = .01), yet less impairment in total WRQOL (P

CONCLUSIONS: WRQOL impairment is substantial for adolescents with severe obesity undergoing WLS, with predictors varying by sex. These patient-data highlight targets for education, support, and adjunctive care referrals before WLS. Furthermore, they provide a comprehensive empirical base for understanding heterogeneity in adolescent WRQOL outcomes after WLS, as weight and comorbidity profiles change over time.

DOI10.1016/j.jpeds.2014.11.022
Alternate JournalJ. Pediatr.
PubMed ID25556022
PubMed Central IDPMC4344894
Grant ListM01-RR00188 / RR / NCRR NIH HHS / United States
U01 DK072493 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
U01DK072493 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
UL1 RR024153 / RR / NCRR NIH HHS / United States
UL1 TR000077-04 / TR / NCATS NIH HHS / United States
UL1RR025755 / RR / NCRR NIH HHS / United States
UL1TR000005 / TR / NCATS NIH HHS / United States
UL1TR000165 / TR / NCATS NIH HHS / United States
UM1 DK072493 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
UM1DK072493 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
UM1DK095710 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States

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